Book Reviews Archive

The Taiga Syndrome by Cristina Rivera Garza

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Garza's use of language and suspense is so skillful that she can remind us of the artifice of fiction in one moment, holding us up so we can see everything in its place, and in the next push our heads back beneath the surface of its conceit.

Everyone Rides the Bus in a City of Losers by Jason Freure

Author: | Categories: Book Reviews, Poetry No comments
But in Montreal, according to Freure's speaker, everyone is a loser in the best sense of the word.

So Far So Good by Ursula K. Le Guin

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Readers who rest in these meditative poems are sure to find the voice of the beloved Le Guin just as intriguing as they did in her prose.

After the Winter by Guadalupe Nettel, translated by Rosalind Harvey

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Guadalupe Nettel's writing, in an excellent translation by Rosalind Harvey, is spare, occasionally eerie and always elegant.

Human Hours by Catherine Barnett

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As Barnett unfolds for readers the hours of a particular human life, she simultaneously asks readers to examine their own hours.

When Rap Spoke Straight to God by Erica Dawson

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Readers must view Dawson's book-length poem from an intersectional lens—regarding the impact on the narrative voices of the white gaze, the male gaze, and the gaze of the self—in order to fully experience its nuances.

Other People’s Love Affairs by D. Wystan Owen

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D. Wystan Owen’s beautiful debut collection is a book to treasure. The ten quiet stories are linked by place, but they are also linked by Owen’s great fascination with understanding the weight of the past on the present.

The Third Hotel by Laura van den Berg

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Buoyed by van den Berg's sinuous, marvelous sentences, the novel is a deep dive into memory, love, and loss as filtered through film theory, metaphysics, and the humid, sunstroked cityscape of Havana.

The Incendiaries by R. O. Kwon

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The book generates considerable momentum through its short chapters and often gorgeous language, and through the always present search for understanding. It is a difficult book to put down, one whose images and ideas remain long after the read.

The Secret Habit of Sorrow by Victoria Patterson

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Each story is short yet encompassing, and while the plots don't connect, the collection coheres thematically. Nearly all of the protagonists and those characters eddying around them feel this secret habit of sorrow.