Series Archive

Imagining the Anthropocene: Evoking an Ecological Occult

Author: | Categories: Series No comments
Human society is built on superficial impositions of order: government, religion, science, and language attempt to enervate chaos. But for Jane Mead, a poet entrusted with her family’s California vineyard in the midst of a historic drought, there’s no hiding from earth’s mists and windstorms.

Stories Strangely Told: Stuart Dybek’s “Misterioso”

Author: | Categories: Series No comments
An art that constantly changes contour is an art that keeps us free, keeps us questioning and alive.

Throwback Thursday: Animal Farm by George Orwell

Author: | Categories: Series No comments
The moral of the story is perhaps a bit dark, and the suggestion that there is no way to revolt and gain substantive change is perhaps one that has evolved in the nearly three-quarters of a century since the time that the novella was published.

Big Picture, Small Picture: Context for Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man Is Hard to Find

Author: | Categories: Series No comments
These narratives depict a South struggling for identity in the middle years of the twentieth century, peopled with crooked Bible salesmen, earnest preachers, escaped convicts, one-armed grifters, and wayward souls seeking salvation, or at least satisfaction.

Confronting Our Environmental Apocalypse: The Tragic Possibilities

Author: | Categories: Series No comments
Tragedy opens up aesthetic possibilities, allowing suprahuman forces to partake as literary subjects that overwhelm individual characters. It is a mode of expression that goes beyond what realistic fiction can provide.

Imagining the Anthropocene: The Dissolving, Consuming Selves of Jane Wong’s Overpour

Author: | Categories: Series No comments
Landscape sculptor Andy Goldsworthy has said, “The field is a beautiful forum for the fight for nourishment.” Jane Wong brings that forum to the page.

Imagining the Anthropocene: What We Belong To and the Appeal of First-Person Plural

Author: | Categories: Series No comments
Symbolic as my singular action was, it was optimism in practice, opting for the choice to join a collective demonstration of resistance. These days, I’m far more likely to feel that “we” have ruined things than that “we” can affect the world to come.

Stories Strangely Told: Sherwood Anderson’s “Hands”

Author: | Categories: Series No comments
On quick glance then not much of "Hands" seems overtly experimental—the only oddity is that without George asking and without Wing disclosing, we somehow arrive at Wing's backstory.

The Black Aesthetic: Guns & Execution in TI’s Us or Else

Author: | Categories: Series No comments
In his latest album Us or Else: Letter to the System, T.I. exposes America's obsession with guns, questions the senseless killings of African American men by both blacks and whites, and the imminent need for social retribution.

Fiction Responding to Fiction: James Thurber and Rivka Galchen

Author: | Categories: Series No comments
The narrator in Rivka Galchen's story "The Lost Order" is akin to Walter Mitty, the protagonist in James Thurber's "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," who sees himself as defined only in his dreams, not by the man he is in real life. They are both negative images.