Roundup: Is a Literary City in Your Summer Travel Plans?

In our Roundups segment, we’re looking back at all the great posts since the blog started in 2009. We explore posts from our archives as well as other top literary magazines and websites, centered on a certain theme to help you jump-start your week.

Summer has finally arrived, so start making your travel plans. Intending to do some literary-themed vacations or road trips this year? Here’s a list of places where you can get your bookshopping, writing inspiration, and literary geekiness on:

From Ploughshares:

A while back we did a “Literary Boroughs” series of book-ish and book-y places around the US and the globe. Here are some destinations (in the form of a helpful itinerary):

  • 2036277618_912f1fcdacSince Ploughshares is based in Boston, we’ll start off with our lovely Beantown’s rich literary history (in two parts here and here!).
  • Head down to Baltimore, the self-named “The City That Reads,” tour its many bookstores, and brush up on your Poe history.
  • Fly out to Denver, where there are some great book events and nonprofit writing centers.
  • Head up to Portland and visit Powell’s, home to over a million used and new books.
  • End your trip in Seattle spending time writing at the many (many!) coffeeshops.
  • Need someplace further afield? Head to Berlin, Prague, Dublin, or Madrid.

From Around the Web:

Finally: What is your favorite literary destination? Tell us in the comments!

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We are always looking for great work. Have you considered submitting to Ploughshares?

About Jessica A. Kent

Jessica A. Kent is the Marketing Intern at Ploughshares Literary Magazine, and is pursuing an MFA in Fiction at Emerson College. Her work has appeared in Emerson Review, Relevant Magazine, Boston Literary Magazine, Corkboard, Englewood Review of Book, and Barnes & Noble Inside; she’s also the recipient of the Lea Lovenheim Award for Short Fiction. Jessica is the founding editor of the Boston Book Blog.
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2 Responses to Roundup: Is a Literary City in Your Summer Travel Plans?

  1. Not quite a destination for us, but we’d love to plug Pittsburgh as one of the nation’s most literary cities. People were recognizing this as early as 2007, with Pop City’s article “Top 10 Reasons Why Pittsburgh is a Literary Star.”

    A lot’s happened since 2007, and we still have a number of outstanding readings and lectures, especially the world-class Drue Heinz Lecture Series. The city was the incubator and is home to several literary journals, including Hot Metal Bridge, Weave, The Fourth River, and Caketrain.

    A number of renowned authors were born or spent significant time in Pittsburgh, including (off the top of our heads) Stewart O’Nan, August Wilson, Annie Dillard, John Edgar Wideman, Li-Young Lee, Kathleen George, and Michael Chabon.

    And finally, as noted in Peter Oresick’s blog The Pittsburgh Novel: between 1792 and 2012, 1,170 novels were set in Western Pennsylvania. One thousand, one hundred and seventy.

    Not to knock anyone else, but we have vibrant universities, good schools, and a strong library system. We’ve been named one of America’s most liveable cities several years in a row; we’re proud of this city, and we love visitors!

  2. Kitchen Guy says:

    Thanks for the awesome recommendations, getting me so excited for next Summer!

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