Denis Johnson Archive

Round-Up: Denis Johnson, Celadon Books, and Harvard University Press

Author: | Categories: Round-Up No comments
From writer Denis Johnson posthumously winning the Prize for American Fiction to Harvard University Press’s new director, here’s the latest in literary news.

Stories Strangely Told: Denis Johnson’s “Car Crash While Hitchhiking”

Author: | Categories: Reading, Series No comments
When I was twenty and thought I had just about figured out what a story was, my fiction teacher walked me to the oven-sized scanner outside his office to copy onto legal paper the first twelve pages of Denis Johnson’s Jesus’ Son.

The Varying Feelings of Jesus’ Son

Author: | Categories: Reading No comments
Perhaps, in connecting the song’s teachings of drug struggles from the ’60s with those of the book and films of the ’90s, both similarities and differences across these platforms can provide intake on why the opioid epidemic either comes in waves, or never truly leaves.

Round-Up: Denis Johnson, Short Edition, and Khizr Khan

Author: | Categories: Round-Up No comments
From the death of author Denis Johnson to a short story-dispensing machine in Boston, here’s the latest literary news.

The Art of Dialogue for the Reticent

I write down bits of conversation I overhear in the train, in the park, at the checkout line, and borrow the more memorable ones for my own fiction writing. I am interested in the lines that sound strange or nonsensical, because they show a sense of character and intimacy

At Some Point The Writer Should Be Having Fun: An Interview With Arthur Bradford

Author: | Categories: Interviews No comments
An incomplete list of the animals that appear in Arthur Bradford’s latest collection Turtleface and Beyond include a dead cat, a porcupine that menaces a recluse’s outhouse, a dog liberated from the pound, and the eponymous turtle, of face fame. Besides Turtleface, which came out in February, Bradford is the author

New (and Old) Stories (and Poems) from the Midwest

Author: | Categories: Uncategorized No comments
 In a previous post I wrote about Midwestern literature and spent a lot of time defending the region against attack. But there certainly are folks who enjoy the flatland’s contributions to American letters. In fact, more than a few commented and tweeted about their favorites. To keep this conversation

The Books We Teach #4: Interview with Christine Schutt

Author: | Categories: Reading, Writing No comments
The Books We Teach series will feature primary, secondary, and post-secondary educators and their thoughts about literature in the face of an evolving classroom. Posts will highlight literary innovations in teaching, contemporary literature’s place in pedagogy, and the books that writers teach. In the spirit of educational dynamism, we

Going On: After the Apocalypse

Author: | Categories: Uncategorized 1 Comment
Do you have a plan in place for what to do after an apocalypse? Survivalists do. Survivalists, mainstream North American culture thinks, are a little weird. They prepare for severe disruptions in the order of everyday life, for carrying on when these disruptions obliterate the conveniences of our extensive

Goddard College: Talking with Writers about Teaching (Part 2)

Author: | Categories: Uncategorized No comments
My friends and colleagues Darcey Steinke and Douglas A. Martin and I all got together one afternoon during a break from the Goddard College MFA low-residency program where we all teach to talk about the MFA degree in general, what we feel is different about Goddard and  how teaching one-on-one informs us as writers and