fiction Archive

New Ploughshares Solo Now Available!

We're excited to announce the release of our latest Solo, "The Girl Who Lied" by Uche Okonkwo! Read it today for $1.99.

The Learning Curve: Fact, Fiction, and What I’ve Learned

Author: | Categories: Writing No comments
This ability to slip in and out and between voices has been crucial for my style of work. I’ve always been involved in multiple projects at a time, and while I typically finish translating one book before moving on to the next, there are always edits coming back from

Writing Fiction from Life

Author: | Categories: Writing No comments
Some writers that I know are at times so unsure of whether a story is theirs to tell that they will shelve a project for years at a time, waiting for some kind of permission to be granted, or for forgiveness, or for a death. But sometimes those things

Fiction Responding to Fiction: Flannery O’Connor and Alice Munro

Author: | Categories: Reading, Series No comments
Munro has spoken about her debt to American writers from the South, including O’Connor, and we can clearly see how “Save the Reaper” is responding to O’Connor’s story by touching on similar themes and even moments, and yet spinning off from the original in true Munro fashion.

New Ploughshares Solo Now Available!

We’re excited to announce the release of our November Solo, “A History of China” by Carolyn Ferrell.  Following the death of her father, Sasha Jean attends a family reunion, after years of estrangement, with the uncomfortable knowledge that she has inherited the estate where her relatives live. “A History of China” explores the multi–generational

In Bookstores Near You: OUR HEARTS WILL BURN US DOWN by Anne Valente

Author: | Categories: Fiction, Reading No comments
Anne Valente’s debut novel, Our Hearts Will Burn Us Down, does not begin with the shattering moment when Caleb Raynor enters Lewis and Clark High School and opens fire—a moment that surely warrants the dimming of the lights, the rising of a curtain. But no, in Valente’s narrative, the

Review: PATRICIDE by D. Foy

Author: | Categories: Book Reviews, Fiction No comments
The protagonist in D. Foy’s second novel is that angry young kid whose pain and shame he cannot express except in strange orthogonal ways, ways that will only deepen his pain and shame, not alleviate them. But Foy allows us inside that boy’s beleaguered brain box and we feel

Parents Experimenting On Their Children in Fiction

Author: | Categories: Reading No comments
It’s unsurprising that parenting is fertile ground for novelists. There are plenty of stories, both in fiction and in real life, of parental sacrifice for the sake of children. More surprising are the accounts of parents using their children for the sake of their work.

On Intimacy: Elena Ferrante & Stacey D’Erasmo

Author: | Categories: Reading, Writing No comments
It seems as though people do not want to believe that fiction can be intimate—that is: detailed, personal, private, sacred, something with which readers feel closely acquainted or familiar. It is especially surprising if it is also broad, and that one book can accomplish both apparently astounds reviewers.

On Compromise and Character

Author: | Categories: Reading No comments
In The Bay of Angels, author Anita Brookner examines female relationships with unflinching scrutiny. Sometimes I felt like a bug trapped under a hand lens on the pavement, squirming with discomfort, somewhat scorched by the proximity of her fictional approximations and truth.