The Books We Teach #9: Interview with Danielle Dutton

The Books We Teach series will feature primary, secondary, and post-secondary educators and their thoughts about literature in the face of an evolving classroom. Posts will highlight literary innovations in teaching, contemporary literature’s place in pedagogy, and the books that writers teach. In the spirit of educational dynamism, we encourage readers to contribute their thoughts in the comments section.

Screen shot 2014-01-07 at 12.30.16 AMDanielle Dutton is the author of Attempts at a Life (Tarpaulin Sky) and S P R A W L (Siglio Press), a finalist for the Believer Book Award. Her work has appeared in Harper’s, BOMB, NOON, The Collagist and elsewhere, and anthologized in A Best of Fence and Where We Live Now: An Annotated Reader. She has taught in the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa and is now an assistant professor at Washington University in St. Louis. In addition to teaching and writing, she founded and edits Dorothy, a publishing project, “dedicated to works of fiction or near fiction or about fiction, mostly by women.”

Here, Danielle and I discuss her new class “The Irregularity of Form,” Lena Dunham’s giant book advance, her perverse affinity for assigning “Kew Gardens” to undergrads, and useful thorns in class conversation.

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The Books We Teach #3: Interview with Susan Daitch

The Books We Teach series will feature primary, secondary, and post-secondary educators and their thoughts about literature in the face of an evolving classroom. Posts will highlight literary innovations in teaching, contemporary literature’s place in pedagogy, and the books that writers teach. In the spirit of educational dynamism, we encourage readers to contribute their thoughts in the comments section.

Picture 4Susan Daitch is the author of one story collection and three novels—most recently, the much lauded Paper Conspiracies (City Lights, 2011). Her work has appeared in Tin House, Guernica, Conjunctions, Ploughshares, The Brooklyn Rail, and McSweeney’s, among others, and has been anthologized in The Norton Anthology of Postmodern American Fiction. Recently it was also featured in The Review of Contemporary Fiction. Susan has taught writing at Columbia University, Barnard College, and The Iowa Writers’ Workshop. She now teaches at Hunter College.

Here, Susan chats with me about advice she has for young writers, the differences between teaching undergraduate and graduate students, and a few works that she turns to as a teacher, time and time again.

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