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Harper Lee Archive

Cartoons & Archetypes: How They Work and What to Know

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I learned about character development not by studying it, but by understanding the nature of cartoons. I spent years sculpting superheroes and cartoon characters for DC Comics, Nickelodeon, Pixar, and others. Although the perception is changing, the art world considers cartooning of all kinds to be a distant, lesser

Literary Meals & Cocktails for the Summer

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Maybe it’s because I’m always hungry, but meals have always been some of the most memorable scenes in books. I drink tea from a porcelain tea cup while reading Oscar Wilde, and crave fried okra or salt pork between readings of Faulkner and Harper Lee.

Big Picture, Small Picture: Context for Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird

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September 14, 1919. A lynch mob gathers outside of the county jail in Monroeville, Alabama. They are there for Frank and Brown Ezell, father and son, who have just been arrested for the murder of a white store owner.

Booze, Books, and Boys: Literary Friendships Throughout History

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Oscar Wilde and Bram Stoker Oscar Wilde was the son of Lady Jane, an eclectic socialite who collected artists like trophies. Bram Stoker was a frequent feature in her Saturday night salons, although the two met at a young age and were fast friends through the rest of their

Round-Up: Lost H.P. Lovecraft manuscript, Yalc, and publishing changes for TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

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From a rediscovered H.P. Lovecraft manuscript to the discussion on how To Kill A Mockingbird will appear in classrooms, this is last week’s literary news: A long-lost H.P. Lovecraft manuscript has surfaced from a collection of memorabilia belonging to the late Harry Houdini. The collection was purchased by a private buyer who discovered

Round-Up: Harper Lee, Children’s Book Controversy, and #1000BlackGirlBooks Update

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From the loss of the beloved author Harper Lee to an author’s response to Scholastic’s withdrawal of his book, here’s what’s new this week in literature:   Harper Lee, author of the Pulitzer Prize winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird, died last Friday at the age of 89. To

Round-Up: TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD on Broadway, National Book Foundation Announcement, and a New Harry Potter Book

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From the latest developments in literary theater to a new Executive Director for The National Book Foundation, find out what’s happening in the literary world: The New York Times reported last week that Harper Lee’s famous novel To Kill a Mockingbird will be adapted for Broadway. Scott Rudin, producer

Round-Down: Why GO SET A WATCHMAN May Have Been Better Unpublished

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Discussion surrounding the recent release of Harper Lee’s purported To Kill a Mockingbird prequel–or draft, or sequel–Go Set a Watchman has dominated the literary community for the past several weeks. Just about every article on Watchman touches on the question of either whether Lee consented to having the long stowed-away manuscript released. At

Round-Down: What You Should Know Going Into GO SET A WATCHMAN

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Today, July 14, is an auspicious day in literary news: Harper Lee’s much anticipated, and controversial, Go Set A Watchman is officially released across the world. An event for the record books–the title already broke the pre-order record held by the Harry Potter series and promises to break still

Harper Lee and the Politics of Genius in Today’s Age

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The intensity of the reaction to news of beloved author Harper Lee publishing a sequel to her masterpiece, To Kill A Mockingbird, is ironic, given the very reasons we thought we’d never see this day come: Lee often proclaimed that her first book had said all she wanted to say,