New York Times Archive

Round Up: #Brexit, Apple’s E-Book Settlement, and Barnes & Noble’s Tough Year

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From #Brexit to Barnes & Noble's major financial hit, here are some of last week's most important literary stories: This past week, the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union. The referendum (often referred to as "Brexit") took place on June 23.

Booze, Books, and Boys: Literary Friendships Throughout History

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Oscar Wilde and Bram Stoker Oscar Wilde was the son of Lady Jane, an eclectic socialite who collected artists like trophies. Bram Stoker was a frequent feature in her Saturday night salons, although the two met at a young age and were fast friends through the rest of their

Round-Up: TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD on Broadway, National Book Foundation Announcement, and a New Harry Potter Book

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From the latest developments in literary theater to a new Executive Director for The National Book Foundation, find out what’s happening in the literary world: The New York Times reported last week that Harper Lee’s famous novel To Kill a Mockingbird will be adapted for Broadway. Scott Rudin, producer

Round-Down: Young or Old, Why Do We Write?

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One essential question rises out of the hullabaloo of conflicting opinions broadcast in Cynthia Ozick’s philosophical essay in the New York Times on old vs. new writers and The New Republic’s Phoebe Maltz Bovy’s prickly response: Why do we write? Both essays are well written, thoughtful, and make excellent

Round-Down: The Torture Report Book

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On December 30th, 2014, acclaimed independent publisher Melville House released a print copy of the Senate Intelligence Committee’s “Study of the Central Intelligence Agency’s Detention and Interrogation Program”—also known as the Senate Torture Report. Though the material is in the public domain (has been since December 9th, is only

Round Down: When Books Are As Essential As Bread And Water

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Whenever I drive to my real local library or the Barnes & Noble near my house, I’m always disappointed I can find a parking space so easily. Trust me, I love convenience. But where is everyone? What are they doing that’s more fun than browsing the shelves? Every man

The Ploughshares Round-Down: The State of Poetry in the US

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Early last month, PEN International publicly condemned the killing of Thai poet Mainueng K. Kunthee. The poet had been shot to death on April 23rd, presumably because of his public criticisms of the monarchy and Thailand’s lèse majesté law.  Known as a poet of the people, Kunthee was immensely popular; his work “spoke of social justice,

The Ploughshares Round-Down: That Time A Famous Author Failed And Blamed Ebooks

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Last year, I was talking to a romance novelist who self-publishes her books. She had decided to go this route after submitting a manuscript directly to Harlequin and not hearing back from them for months. What forced her hand was that she had kids, she had been working part-time,

Writers With Responsibilities: Keep Your Mojo

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Dear Sally, I found my voice relatively late in life—40—but once I started to write I couldn’t imagine a life without it. I took classes, joined writing groups, and wrote all the time. I published essays in my local paper and people stopped me in the grocery store to

Chucking “Art for Art’s Sake” – Writers and Social Impact

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One morning in late September, I found myself backstage at the “Annual Day of Peace” in Covington, KY—an event that kicks off October as Domestic Violence Awareness Month. I’d been asked to perform a song I wrote about my family’s history of domestic violence, and was listening as speakers