NPR Archive

The Readers: Maureen Corrigan and the Fictions That Endure

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If you listen to NPR, you might vaguely recognize Maureen Corrigan’s voice. Even and deliberate, it always has an elusive quality: Corrigan’s book review segments on Fresh Air, usually ranging from five to eight minutes, are self-contained things, and every word feels carefully chosen.

Latinx Faculty at Writing Retreats

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Novelist Cristina García and I were recently discussing the diversity of writing communities at summer retreats, and both came to a similar conclusion: writing retreats both new and long-established are devoid of Latinx faculty.

Round-Up: TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD on Broadway, National Book Foundation Announcement, and a New Harry Potter Book

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From the latest developments in literary theater to a new Executive Director for The National Book Foundation, find out what’s happening in the literary world: The New York Times reported last week that Harper Lee’s famous novel To Kill a Mockingbird will be adapted for Broadway. Scott Rudin, producer

Round-Down: Extra! Extra! Paper Lives!

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Despite the endless negative news reports and doomsday forecasts regarding the rise of eBooks at the expense of paper books, recent studies and reports vindicate those of us who prefer pulp to pixels. According to the American Booksellers Association, independent booksellers are continuing to add new stores, which means there

Writers with Responsibilities: Ode to the Late Bloomers

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Julia Child didn’t start cooking until she was close to forty and I didn’t either. For me it wasn’t the Le Cordon Blue School, but a need to finally be heard. I found my voice after my fourth child was born. I stopped telling tales at the bus stop

The Ploughshares Round-down: The Problem with Literary Doomsday Laments

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We who love literature face an urgent crisis: a gruesome epidemic of articles worrying over the demise of literature, reading, English Departments, and apparently (along with them) culture, art, morality, humanity, and ALL KNOWLEDGE AND CIVILIZATION. We’re in dire need of an antidote for this doom–prophesying fever, these impassioned warnings about “philistinism.” (A word that, btw, needs

The Ploughshares Round-Down: Hashtags and Heresy

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Hello again, Writers. So I was driving to New York City a few weeks ago for a conference at NYU, where I talked about the ways story and song benefit public discourse. To say I’d been obsessing over the political impact of storytelling would be an understatement. So maybe it’s no surprise that

The Ploughshares Round-Down: Creativity Is Neither Magic Nor Madness

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At the end of 2009, I was hunched in the passenger seat of a van, weeping down a midwest interstate. We’d just recorded an album with a Grammy-winning producer, paying for it with months of fan-funding hype. And we were touring to promote it, planning to release it ASAP,

Roundup: They’re Creepy & They’re Kooky

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In our Roundups segment, we’re looking back at all the great posts since the blog started in 2009. We explore posts from our archives as well as other top literary magazines and websites, centered on a certain theme to help you jump-start your week. The month of October is heralded by an onslaught

Roundup: We Are Family

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In our Roundups segment, we’re looking back at all the great posts since the blog started in 2009. We explore posts from our archives as well as other top literary magazines and websites, centered on a certain theme to help you jump-start your week. Summer is here, and it’s