poetry Archive

Contemporary Native American Poetry Essentials

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Some of the most interesting work in Contemporary American poetry is being done by American Indian writers. And yet, in the ongoing (and important) conversations about diversity and inclusion in United States literary production—especially in poetry—the work by Native Americans is often left out.

Lying in a Hammock

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Reader, I am having a bad day. I am having a bad day, and I can’t seem to write anything worth your time, and so I have flipped through my books and settled on James Wright’s “Lying in a Hammock at William Duffy’s Farm in Pine Island, Minnesota.”

3 Chapbook Reviews: Loving and Living in Louisiana

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Sometimes, place is an obvious theme or motif in a work, while other times it informs a work in a subtler but still necessary way.

It Might Be Lonelier Without the Loneliness: Poetry and Loneliness

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Poems, for me, are the epitome of Dickinson’s capital-L Loneliness, that loneliness that accompanies and keeps one from feeling utterly alone, its shadow-shape, its cameo presence.

Against Epigraphs

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A poem’s epigraph does more than set the tone—it raises the stakes before the poem even begins. Almost every poem could have an epigraph, if inspiration and interest were the criteria. But I’d like to propose the opposite. Let’s put a moratorium on epigraphs.

“frank ocean and all black things that disappear on their own”: A Conversation with Jonathan Jacob Moore

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A discussion with Jonathan Jacob Moore regarding Frank Ocean, blackness, queerness, presence/absence, music, and Moore's recent poem "frank ocean and all black things that disappear on their own."

Poet Activist Spotlight: Franny Choi

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“Poetry is a space in which logic plays a secondary role to imagination and feeling, and that can be a really great playground for a young person who is trying to define themselves and understand the world (i.e., all young people).” —Franny Choi

So Much Depends Upon: America’s Most Misread Poems

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Over the years, I’ve distilled people’s reactions down to a core set of misconceptions about poetry. Some of the most pervasive: Poetry is overly difficult. It’s obtuse on purpose. It’s like a riddle. You need to read between the lines. It can mean anything you want it to.

Review: A WOMAN OF PROPERTY by Robyn Schiff

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A new kind of writing about motherhood may be emerging. Rachel Zucker's and Arielle Greenberg's Home/Birth, Brenda Shaughnessy's Our Andromeda, Eula Biss's On Immunity, and Maggie Nelson's The Argonauts, for example, are conscious in a contemporary way about new possibilities of childbearing and parenting, about choices and agency, yet

With Late Capitalism Hovering in the Background: In Conversation with Wendy Xu and Jesse Hlebo

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“We live in a late-capitalist situation where if something is not worth money then culture says it’s not worth anything at all.”