Shakespeare Archive

“A Way I Could World-Build in Poetry”: An Interview with Margaret Rhee

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Margaret Rhee’s poems use the what-if of machines falling in love as a springboard to launch us into a strange, beautiful, unforgettable new world that is all her own. Earlier this year, we had the chance to talk about poems, robotic realities, and whether someday machines might really fall

Reading Frantumaglia After the Unmasking of Elena Ferrante

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It’s been impossible to ignore the furor surrounding the revelation of Elena Ferrante’s identity last month. Some consider it an inevitability, yet the majority of her fans seem to feel that it is enough to have been given the gift of her writing, without expressly violating her wishes.

Witches in Literature, or Bodies as Translators of Fear

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Lady sorceresses are vessels of fear through their bodies , or representations used to translate terror. A witch’s greatest strength is her body, as when Circe seduces and distract Odysseus from his journey; it is her greatest weakness, too, as when the Wicked Witch of the West is destroyed:

In HBO’s Westworld, Literature Is the Key to Personhood

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HBO’s Westworld is rife with literary references that, like the androids populating the titular park, have started to take on a life of their own.

Round-Up: Frankfurt Book Fair, Bob Dylan, and HENRY VI

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From the rise in attendance at the Frankfurt Book Fair to the research that names Christopher Marlowe as a co-author of Henry VI, here are last week's biggest literary headlines.

A Held Breath: Alice Munro’s “Tricks” and Waiting in Literature

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I am in the midst of an anticipating season. My first book comes out in a month; my second baby will be born in a little over two. I’m finding that in terms of productivity right now I’m pretty useless.

Dancing With Text

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Juliet. Aurora. Desdemona. Julie Kent has portrayed them all, bringing texts to life during a 30 year performing career as one of America’s premier ballerinas. Last year, Kent retired from her position as Principal Dancer with American Ballet Theatre and has since taken the helm at The Washington Ballet.

The Best Short Story I Read in a Lit Mag This Week: “Appellations” by Faith Shearin

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Juliet famously said of Romeo’s surname, “That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet,” which may be true, but also—as the rest of the Bard’s play argued—problematic. So what is in a name? “Appellations” by Faith Shearin (FRiGG) explores what bearing names can

Round-Up: NEW YORKER Poem Controversy, PEN/Faulkner Award, and Rare Shakespeare First Folio

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From a New Yorker poem sparking widespread criticism to a newly discovered First Folio, here’s what went on last week in literary news: Controversy arose last week around a poem by Calvin Trillin published in The New Yorker. The poem, titled “Have They Run Out of Provinces Yet?”, sparked criticism from

Fear and Narrative

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There’s a little door in the corner of our almost-three-year-old daughter’s bedroom, and she’s very convinced something is going to come out of it. It isn’t even a door, really—it’s an access panel for getting at the problematic plumbing in the bathroom next door. I’ve come to really, really