T.S. Eliot Archive

Round-Up: Brian Aldiss, T.S. Eliot, and Beyoncé

Author: | Categories: Round-Up No comments
From the death of science fiction writer Brian Aldiss to a writers’ retreat at T.S. Eliot’s former summer house, we've rounded up the latest literary news.

The “fall” of “The Hollow Men”

Author: | Categories: Reading No comments
When I first started watching BBC's serial killer drama The Fall, I was excited to discover that the episode titles were all famous lines from Paradise Lost. But the title is also a reference to another, very different classic poem: “The Hollow Men” by T.S. Eliot.

The Ambiguous Epiphany

Author: | Categories: Reading No comments
When I was a child growing up Catholic, the Feast of the Epiphany struck me as an afterthought. December was all about the thrilling run-up of Advent, characterized by candle lighting and singing at mass and by lists for Santa and chocolate-filled calendars at home. Finally there was the

Moments in the Rose-Garden: The Literature of Stillness

Author: | Categories: Reading, Writing No comments
When my brother and I were kids, my parents would watch what we called “screensaver movies”: films that moved at a leisurely pace and boasted periods of little action in the traditional sense, featuring instead long, lingering shots of landscapes, interiors, characters’ expressions. We mocked and groused.

When Women Writers Become Nightmares

Author: | Categories: Authors, Fiction, Poetry, Reading No comments
When we go to inspect female-presenting writers, the canon is too familiar: Emily Dickinson, Charlotte Bronte, Jane Austen. There’s no purpose in arguing this. What’s more interesting is uncovering forgotten women writers—women who wrote poetry with T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound in life, or produced movies with Alfred Hitchcock.

How We Belong Somewhere

Author: | Categories: Poetry, Reading No comments
How does a poet come to belong to a place? Who are the poets of our American places? As I travel in and around Boston I’m reminded of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. His verses leap to mind when visiting Plymouth, the Wayside Inn in Sudbury, or the Old North Church

The Poetry of Place: Origins

Author: | Categories: Reading No comments
When I was a teenager I read T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound obsessively. (And yet somehow managed not to have a girlfriend. Go figure.) Eliot and Pound might seem stodgy and academic to most but for me—growing up in Fresno, California—they represented a larger, better world. Ivy League schools.

Review: EXCERPTS FROM A SECRET PROPHECY by Joanna Klink

Author: | Categories: Book Reviews, Poetry No comments
Excerpts from a Secret Prophecy Joanna Klink Penguin, 2015 Poetry | $20 80 pages, 6×9 in Buy: Paperback As a stopped clock is right twice a day, so book blurbs are right a few times a year. On the back cover of Joanna Klink’s fourth book, Terrance Hayes declares,

Lying as survival: the literary pep talk

Author: | Categories: Writing, Writing Advice No comments
Has a young child ever asked you to watch him run? Are you ready? he asks, and then the same intense eyes that one tries to remember a dream with. Then his arms start pumping at a speed that must seem lightning-fast to his own mind but really looks

Harold Bloom’s Song of Self

Author: | Categories: Reading, Writing No comments
Here’s the story of my first and only encounter with Harold Bloom. It was the first week of a new semester, my last semester of graduate school, and I was waiting in a stuffy seminar room packed with sharply dressed undergraduates. The luckiest students had secured seats around the grand