Fiction Archive

Black Sunday by Tola Rotimi Abraham

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In Tola Rotimi Abraham’s debut novel, two young girls see the linkage of sex, money, and religion on the path to power.

Blue Flowers by Carola Saavedra

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Obsessive love is a theme as old as the Iliad, but Saavedra’s novel gives it her own enigmatic twist, joining the ranks of Latin American authors who are transforming our literary landscape in vivid, thrilling ways.

Cleanness by Garth Greenwell

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Greenwell’s novel feels at once perilously modern and coolly baroque; a Sebaldian melancholy wafts up like a fog through the spaces in his lovingly turned sentences.

Topics of Conversation by Miranda Popkey

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In Miranda Popkey’s debut novel, conversation has the power to shape the story of a life.

The Hills Reply by Tarjei Vesaas

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Vesaas’s language is rich and thickening, replete with extended metaphors that are visionary, haunting, and half-mad, recalling the ebullient, runaway brushwork of Van Gogh.

The Factory by Hiroko Oyamada

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Oyamada’s new novel is a tale of inaction rather than revolt, a story about the warm, velvety embrace of production models. Her characters seem exemplars of a particularly post-millennial brand of jaded helplessness, one that’s the result of living lives in the shadow of exploitative labor systems so all-encompassing

Last of Her Name by Mimi Lok

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In Mimi Lok’s debut story collection, the characters are linked in their sense of displacement and isolation, both connected to and separate from their families and their shared histories.

Girl by Edna O’Brien

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Edna O’Brien performs a sort of tight-rope act, strung between the stream-like nature of her prose and the painful shards of her story. Brutality stomps through the pages of her new novel, astonishing in its recurrence and terrifying in the variable justifications that underpin it.

Rerun Era by Joanna Howard

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In her new memoir, Joanna Howard questions a world where suffering is only acceptable when it is entertaining, when it is something people can watch again and again.

The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates

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Coates’ debut novel builds stories within stories, revisiting pre-Civil War America through the eyes of a survivor of the slave trade.