Book Reviews Archive

The Day the Sun Died by Yan Lianke

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Yan Lianke’s new novel asks: Are we dreamwalking through our entire lives?

Revolution Sunday by Wendy Guerra

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Wendy Guerra, award-winning poet, novelist, actress, and television host, tackles surveillance, paranoia, and the instability of reality in her second novel translated into English.

The Houseguest and Other Stories by Amparo Dávila

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Amparo Dávila’s collection is reminiscent of Shirley Jackson, Franz Kafka, and Edgar Allen Poe, and tests the limits of fiction.

Since When by Bill Berkson

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Since When is unlike any poet’s memoir I’ve ever read. It’s a treasure.

Dissolve by Sherwin Bitsui

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At the center of Dissolve, a single line repeats four times: "I breathe it in." These inhalations encapsulate both the rich density and the immersive capacity of Bitsui's work.

Unfurled by Michelle Bailat-Jones

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In Unfurled, the reader is pulled forward in short, well-crafted chapters that simulate the rough-and-tumble journey through shock, grief, and the revelation of knowledge that the narrator initially rejects—that her mother survived and was in touch with her father.

The Lake on Fire, by Rosellen Brown

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In response to her novel, The Lake on Fire, Rosellen Brown has been compared to both Jane Austen and Tillie Olsen.

The Shallows by Stacey Lynn Brown

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Though each of these poems embodies the heaviness of illness, their beauty is evinced in the pauses, the generous white spaces to be found in this book of poems.

The Taiga Syndrome by Cristina Rivera Garza

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Garza's use of language and suspense is so skillful that she can remind us of the artifice of fiction in one moment, holding us up so we can see everything in its place, and in the next push our heads back beneath the surface of its conceit.

Everyone Rides the Bus in a City of Losers by Jason Freure

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But in Montreal, according to Freure's speaker, everyone is a loser in the best sense of the word.