haruki murakami Archive

Stories Without Women

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Men Without Women is a familiar, easily identifiable, and oddly comforting book for the Murakami reader, privileging the emotional landscape of lonely Japanese men through scaffolding characterization, personal idiosyncrasy, and monkey-wrench narratives.

An Aquarium in Paris

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Sinking down the basement steps of the Palais Porte Dorée in Paris is to find it much as it was in its inaugural year. The hulking Art Deco palace was a centerpiece of the 1931 Colonial Exposition—a World’s Fair-type undertaking meant to reinvest French citizens of the interwar period

Beyond Haruki Murakami: Where to Find Japanese Lit

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Forget Haruki Murakami. Welcome to the world of Mariko Nagai and Asa Nonami. This month’s Asian lit coverage includes two Japanese short stories by Nagai and Nonami (which center on gender and death), some lit mags featuring a wealth of Asian lit—and a Japanese movie that’ll make you laugh

Reading as Intoxicant, Part II: Ten Books That Are Basically Drugs

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Don’t do drugs, kids; read books instead. More often than not, they inspire the same chemical rush with less brain trauma. Herein is a list of ten books with intoxicating, stimulatory, or hallucinatory qualities for the literarily psychotropically-inclined. Though no doubt many deserving books would be right at home

Capsule Reviews: Murakami, Burton, and More

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Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami In literary locales from Tokyo to London, Murakami’s latest novel was heralded with the hype of a summer blockbuster. In Japan alone, a million copies were sold within five weeks of the book’s publication in 2013—and following its

Walking to Write

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It should be no surprise that walking relieves stress and anxiety and increases creativity, but now a recent study at Stanford University has found that walking, even for just ten minutes, increases creativity by sixty percent. (Apparently, there was no difference between walking outside and walking on a treadmill in

Exercising Your Craft: 3 Writers Who Get Physical

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I have a writer friend whose employment info on her Facebook profile always makes me laugh. Under “Position,” she wryly reports “Hunched Over a Desk.” Treadmill desks and Hemingway-style standing aside, most writers spend a lot of time sitting. We’re exhorted to with quotes like this one from Mary