Round-Up: Trevor Noah’s Memoir, Paula Hawkins’ New Novel, and Bob Dylan’s Nobel Prize Speech

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From Trevor Noah’s recent memoir to a new novel from Paula Hawkins, here are this week’s biggest literary headlines: Trevor Noah, the host of The Daily Show, recently released his memoir Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood. As the child of a Xhosa mother and a Swiss-German father

I, Gambler

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Much like the games they glamorize, gambling narratives are fraught with risk. They risk losing the reader in the minutiae of strategy and tactics.

In Sickness: Feeling Unwell in the Wake of the U.S. Election

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In the days after the U.S. presidential election last month, people became sick. Friends, colleagues, and mere acquaintances narrated their symptoms.

Clearing off the Cobwebs: Seneca Falls, New York and the first Women’s Rights Convention

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I was hopeful a few weeks ago, on Halloween weekend, when I drove to Seneca Falls, New York. There, in 1848, Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and other reformers organized the first Women’s Rights Convention...

Postludes: An Interview with Matthew Burnside

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Matthew Burnside is a writer and educator. He is currently working on a collection of science fiction stories and a series of young adult adventure novels.

Indie Spotlight: Year-end Wrap-up

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Now we’re in the midst of the holidays, it's a terrific time to turn your attention toward independent presses, whether you’re purchasing gifts or considering where to make your year-end donations. With the tightest of budgets and smallest of staffs, independent presses annually produce ambitious books that may not

Carefully Chosen Words: Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Vladimir Nabokov

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One of my favorite little known facts about Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is that she was a student in Vladimir Nabokov’s European Literature class at Cornell when she was an undergraduate in the 1950s. Nabokov’s influence is seen in many of Ginsburg’s writings.

Review: THE IRRESISTIBLE INTROVERT: HARNESS THE POWER OF QUIET CHARISMA IN A LOUD WORLD by Michael Chung

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Throughout her book, Chung reiterates the differences between extroverts and introverts, but eschews any claims of advantageousness. One person exults in a bar with his riotous friends while another broods in a library without anyone interrupting her. They’ll use different taps to distill pleasure from our world, but at

Fiction Responding to Fiction: Flannery O’Connor and Alice Munro

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Munro has spoken about her debt to American writers from the South, including O’Connor, and we can clearly see how “Save the Reaper” is responding to O’Connor’s story by touching on similar themes and even moments, and yet spinning off from the original in true Munro fashion.

Writing Trauma: Notes of Transcendence, #6—Memoir’s Ladder to Recovery

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Through his words, the writer calls for change. He transforms traumatic experience from a state of helpless victimhood into one of empowered transcendence.