Being Seen: Latinx and Queer Visibility at Writing Conferences

Author: | Categories: Writing No comments
Visibility isn’t a vague term. You either see Latinx and Queer writers or you don’t. I don’t want to believe that literary conferences deliberately exclude writers, but I do believe that an oversight is made when a conference planning committee doesn’t try to represent every aspect of the literary

“your long, dark time”: Aracelis Girmay’s THE BLACK MARIA

Author: | Categories: Series No comments
Resistance to the fact of human-caused climate change remains rampant. If we are to preserve our species by reversing humans’ catastrophic impact on earth systems, we must facilitate a deeper cultural understanding of our relationship with the planet. This series presents books of poetry that imagine humans’ impact on

Insights into Celebrity Humanitarianism from Zadie Smith’s SWING TIME

Author: | Categories: Reading No comments
It’s not novel for celebrities to dip their toes into humanitarian waters. Actor Danny Kaye was named the first UNICEF ambassador-at-large in 1954, a full two decades before Angelina Jolie was even born. The trope of the well-meaning but clueless celebrity do-gooder is so entrenched that it’s become easy

Feminism and Tillie Olsen’s SILENCES

Author: | Categories: Reading No comments
Though Tillie Olsen published very little in her lifetime, her body of work had a great impact on the women’s movement of the 1960s and ‘70s. She was a champion of underrepresented writers. Olsen’s book, SILENCES, became a classic feminist text, and her works of fiction were met with

Big Picture, Small Picture: Context for H.P. Lovecraft’s THE CALL OF CTHULHU

Author: | Categories: Series No comments
The sickly and nightmare-plagued Lovecraft shows an inclination toward the sciences as a child, but his passion for literature emerges in his early adulthood. At thirty-seven, the master of cosmic horror publishes his genre-defining story “The Call of Cthulhu” in the February 1928 issue of the pulp magazine Weird

Round-Up: Samuel French, LeVar Burton, and Philip Pullman

Author: | Categories: Round-Up No comments
From an iconic bookstore closure to Philip Pullman's big announcement, here's the latest literary news.

On Kindness and Barbarians

Author: | Categories: Reading No comments
Like many people, I’ve been thinking about the past few years a lot lately. Instead of looking at political events, I’ve been looking at stories and movies. Mostly I’ve been thinking about Wes Anderson and Stefan Zweig.

This is Normal: Reading Evil in the Everyday

Author: | Categories: Reading No comments
On Twitter, people keep saying this “isn’t normal.” In this story, the villain is an exception to the rule of normalcy. Maybe, I thought, that story is easier to tell than the real one.

The Black Aesthetic: Sexuality in Beyoncé’s Grammy Award Winning LEMONADE

Author: | Categories: Series No comments
In times of social turmoil, African American poets disseminate messages demanding change. Great writers such as Amiri Baraka and Nikki Giovanni wrote of freedom and the rhetoric of the Black Aesthetic. When poetry is set to music, harmonious beats relay liberating feelings that transcend history and culture.

“Ten Pounds of Potatoes in a 10-Pound Bag”: An Interview with Eileen Pollack

Author: | Categories: Interviews No comments
Eileen Pollack’s stories are smart, big-hearted, and thought-provoking. We recently caught up via email to discuss the differences between novels and short stories—and how changes in society can help novels find their audiences.