Author Archive

The Dissolving, Consuming Selves of Jane Wong’s Overpour

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Landscape sculptor Andy Goldsworthy has said, “The field is a beautiful forum for the fight for nourishment.” Jane Wong brings that forum to the page.

What We Belong To, and The Appeal of First-Person Plural

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Symbolic as my singular action was, it was optimism in practice, opting for the choice to join a collective demonstration of resistance. These days, I’m far more likely to feel that “we” have ruined things than that “we” can affect the world to come.

Imagining the Anthropocene: Lorine Niedecker’s Lake Superior

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Lorine Niedecker’s poem “Lake Superior” cracks open the human history of its eponymous source. Its thirteen fragments splice together geologic details, explorers’ diaries, and firsthand observations to trace white settlers’ incursions into “America’s / Northwest.” She treats research and perception like a geologist treats a rock, as a concrete

Imagining the Anthropocene: Tommy Pico’s NATURE POEM

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Language retains the rhetorical barrier between the wild and the civilized, the false dichotomy upon which humans have built cities and established nations. It’s within this partition that poetic genres like the Romantic lyric and the pastoral took root, ensconcing the obfuscations that Tommy Pico rails against.

“your long, dark time”: Aracelis Girmay’s THE BLACK MARIA

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Resistance to the fact of human-caused climate change remains rampant. If we are to preserve our species by reversing humans’ catastrophic impact on earth systems, we must facilitate a deeper cultural understanding of our relationship with the planet. This series presents books of poetry that imagine humans’ impact on